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Faculty

CS Department
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Owen Astrachan
Email: ola at cs.duke.edu
CS Department
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Jeff Forbes
Email: forbes at cs.duke.edu
CS Department
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Richard Lucic
Email: lucic at cs.duke.edu
CS Department
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Susan Rodger
Email: rodger at cs.duke.edu

Undergraduate Researchers

  • Dametrious Peyton, Summer 2006, Fall 2007
  • Ben Spain, Summer 2006
  • Zach Marshall, Fall 2006
  • Beth Trushkowsky, Fall 2006, Summer 2007
  • Samantha Jones, Fall 2007
  • Diana Ni, Spring 2008
  • Dave Stecher, Spring 2008-Fall 2008

Publications

  • B. Trushkowsky, D. Stecher, and J. Forbes. CoBib: Collaborative indexing and annotation of bibliographic citations (Poster), ACM 2008 Conference on Computer Supported Collaborative Work, San Diego, CA, November 10, 2008. [EXTENDED ABSTRACT]

    Abstract:

    CoBib facilitates the process of surveying literature by using a community's actions, annotations, and referrals. The database architecture for CoBib provides users within research communities the means to collaboratively index and annotate citations by supporting both searching and browsing behavior. The system enables users to learn about research through explicit and implicit recommendations. This poster describes the principles and architecture of CoBib and our work towards effectively sharing references among research communities.
  • J. Forbes, Social Networks as an Introduction to Computer Science (Poster), Proceedings of the Sunbelt XXVIII International Social Network Conference, St. Pete Beach, Florida, January 24, 2008. [POSTER]

    Abstract:

    Despite exponential increases in computational power, examples used in computer science courses have remained largely unchanged and enrollment have seen a recent marked decline. The goal of the HarambeeNet project is to bring educators together to design modules that introduce computer science into existing courses in various disciplines in a way that increases interest for pursuing further study in computer science. We have chosen the Science of Networks as the overarching theme and Social Networks as our immediate focus on which to develop materials and modules that form an alternative introduction to computer science. One reason for choosing this theme is its roots in mathematics, computer science, sociology, and operations research. Another reason is that the topic grounds abstract concepts in a concrete setting immediately familiar, relevant, and intriguing to college students. After surveying the relevant literature, network analysis and visualization tools, sources of data, and curricular materials, a faculty learning community will develop and evaluate modules that can be incorporated into existing courses in math, statistics, computer science, sociology, economics, and related fields. In this talk, we will discuss the current status of our project: highlighting trends in networks courses and demonstrating a module that utilizes our adaptation of a network analysis and visualization tool and web-based social network to analyze user's music listening profiles.
  • Casey Alt, Owen Astrachan, Jeffrey Forbes, Richard Lucic, and Susan Rodger, Social Networks Generate Interest in Computer Science. Proceedings of the 36th Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education, Houston, TX, 2006. [PAPER]

    Abstract:

    For forty years programming has been the foundation of introductory computer science. Despite exponential increases in computational power during this period, examples used in introductory courses have remained largely unchanged. The incredible growth in statistics courses at all levels, in contrast with the decline of students taking computer science courses, points to the potential for introducing computer science at many levels without emphasizing the process of programming: leverage the expertise and role-models provided by high school mathematics teachers by studying topics that arise from social networks and modeling to introduce computer science as an alternative to the traditional programming approach. This new approach may capture the interest of a broad population of students, crossing gender boundaries. We are developing modules that we hope will capture student interest and provide a compelling yet intellectually rich area of study. We plan to incorporate these modules into existing courses in math, statistics, and computer science at a wide variety of schools at all levels.
Last updated Tue Mar 08 13:07:16 EST 2011